Paruresis FAQ - Learn More About Bashful Bladder
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Frequently Asked Questions
Regarding Paruresis

Got questions about Paruresis? Don't worry - we've got the answers!

Bashful Bladder Guide


Is Paruresis a mental or physical condition?


For diagnostic purposes, Paruresis is classified as a social phobia in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV 300.23). This does not mean you have a mental disorder as such, but rather a social phobia - in the same way that extreme shyness is a social phobia. The description given in the DSM classifies Paruresis as a Social Anxiety Disorder with contributing genetic, physiological, and environmental factors. There is growing evidence that anxiety has a genetic and physiological origin.


I'm facing a urine drug test for employment, what can I do?

If you know the test will be soon, get into a recovery program immediately. You may be able to provide a sample without any additional measures.

  • Document your condition with a doctor
  • Familiarize yourself with your legal rights.
  • Private employers have a great deal of freedom to do as they wish consistent with the laws of their own state.
  • Ask your doctor for instruction on how to use a catheter.
  • Getting an independent test of hair, oral fluid, or blood may be an alternative to show that you are not using drugs.

Once your doctor establishes a diagnosis of Paruresis, it may help drug testing labs to offer reasonable accommodation for you to complete the drug test to their satisfaction


What are my chances of recovering fully?

You must first get a medical screen to rule out any physiological or physical causes.

Once you have determined it is Paruresis, dedicate yourself to finding a positive recovery program, like the Bashful Bladder program.

Your recovery success is dependent on your willingness to dedicate time to the process. Recent studies on cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety show that the highest recovery rates coincides with treatment includes cognitive restructuring, and substituting healthy thought patterns.


Should I tell others about my Paruresis?

Those with Paruresis usually hide their condition from others.

However, finding support is essential to your recovery. The more those around you understand the condition and offer support, the more likely your anxiety about your condition will lessen and in turn make it easier to urinate.


How many people suffer from Paruresis?

The National Comorbidity Survey is a survey of 8,098 people on the prevalence and types of various psychiatric disorders. In this survey, 6.6 percent of respondents noted that they experienced a fear of using a toilet away from home.

In other studies, an average of 1 out of 12 people were found to suffer from Paruresis, either incidentally or consistently. That equates to 20 million people in the US.


What causes Paruresis?

Paruresis is a complex disorder and is still being studied. Much evidence points to contributing factors of anxiety disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).


Can changing my diet help in my recovery?

As always, good urinary tract system practices never hurt, so drinking more fluids will help to improve your health. Cranberry juice will help reduce or eliminate infections.

Caffeine such as tea or coffee can stimulate urine production, but it should be used with caution as it can lead to anxiety and compound the problem.

Little is known about the effects of alcohol in conjunction with Paruresis. Alcohol can relax the body and in turn the urinary sphincter, it also relaxes the bladder muscle which reduces the urge and ability to urinate. Until more is known, it is best to avoid alcohol as a solution, especially while in a therapy program.


Should I ask my Doctor about Paruresis?

Yes.

However, you may need to offer a bit of education to your physician, as many are unfamiliar with the condition. Your doctor should perform an exam to rule out physical causes and ask for a medical and family history. Your doctor may run some tests to determine if you are suffering from Paruresis, those tests may include

  • Ultrasound
  • Draining your bladder with a catheter
  • Bladder x-ray (cystogram)
  • Voiding cysto-urethrography, (imaging the bladder and urethra during urination)
  • Urodynamic evaluation, (urinating into a special receptacle attached to the toilet that will measure the volume of urine expelled, the speed it was expelled, and the amount of time it takes.
  • Cystoscopy, this allows an urologist look at the urethra and bladder from the inside.

Talk to your doctor about your ability to urinate in different situations, your doctor may determine that the tests would be unnecessary. Once diagnosed, your doctor can provide you with a letter of diagnosis that can be kept on file with your employer to help avoid suspicion when the need for a drug tests arises as is the case with many employers in this day and age.


Does Paruresis put me at risk for health problems?

The risk of serious health problems for Paruresis patients is not thought to be high, there are a few risks to be aware of however :

  • Some men have reported having chronic prostatitis.
  • Urinary tract infections, due holding urine longer, for both men and women.
  • Limiting your fluid intake can increase the risk of heatstroke, stones in the kidney, gall bladder or salivary glands just to name a few

I am a student in high school or college, how can I recover?

  • Talk to your parents, school nurse or school clinic about your Paruresis. Ask for their assistance in finding a therapy program that is right for you.
  • Find others who have the same condition, join a support group the less you worry about your condition the more power you will have in finding recovery that will work for you.  

What do you offer on this website?

This website offers a course called "Bashful Bladder: How To Stop Paruresis in Seven Days" - which is a week-long program designed to help reduce your bladder shyness.

It uses Neuro-Linguistic Programming (or, NLP) to "reprogram" your mind to get rid of the mental block that causes paruresis.

The course comes on two audio CDs, with a downloadable workbook in PDF format. It's the first of its kind, with phenomenal and life-changing results reported from users. It also comes with a full month-long guarantee, so you can try it out for yourself, and just return it if you're not thrilled with the results.

To get started with your copy, for just $77, simply click here!